Writers Who Love Too Much book launch at City Lights, San Fran

book cover, WRITERS WHO LOVE TOO MUCH: NEW NARRATIVE 1977-1997, edited by Dodie Bellamy and Kevin Killian
Newly published WRITERS WHO LOVE TOO MUCH: NEW NARRATIVE 1977-1997, edited by Dodie Bellamy and Kevin Killian

Nightboat Books has just published Writers Who Love Too Much: New Narrative 1977-1997, an anthology of stories, essays, plays, and other writing edited by Kevin Killian and Dodie Bellamy. A kool cover by Brett Reichman, too. A lot of the writers are West Coast people, LA and San Fransciso (I really miss both cities), some East Coast, and some have got to be in-between, but if they are, I have yet to discover it.

City Lights Bookstore, San Francisco, CA
City Lights Bookstore, San Francisco, CA

Anyway, I’ve just started reading Writers Who Love and have begun with Gabrielle Daniels’ essay on Our Nig by Harriet E. Wilson, “the first novel by an African American woman” to be published in the US. Our Nig was published in 1859 and I read this book over a decade ago. It’s on my shelf now. It’s amazing. My girlfriend at the time, Susan, asked me to remove it from the shelves because the title is outrageous, offensive, and needs explaining. But in 1859 it was not. I kept it on the shelf – maybe I moved it to a more private part of the house (I don’t remember). I was always the only person I knew who read this book. The daily life of a Black woman in 1850s New England. Rough, to say the least.

book cover, Our Nig; or, Sketched from the Life of a Free Black by Harriet E. Wilson (1859)
Our Nig; or, Sketches from the Life of a Free Black by Harriet E. Wilson (1859)

Henry Louis Gates has also discovered this book, and with his skills at finding people from the past, has tried to find Harriet Wilson to learn about her history, the writing of the novel, and anything else he can find about it. His claim is that it is absolutely the first African American women’s novel. 

Daniels’ essay is bringing Our Nig back to me and as soon as I’m finished reading it I’ll read the book again. Yes, the title is harsh in 21st Century America – I kind of agree with Susan – but the book’s important!

There’s lots more in Writers Who Love Too Much! My summer reading. It’s a sexy, scholarly (sorry, I don’t find academics very sexy, either, but I find scholarship to be pretty sexy), writerly history of New Narrative. 

Thanks to Kevin and Dodie for including me! I am humbled and also kinda proud, too.

Read about the City Lights Books book launch of Writers Who Love Too Much.

Maybe buy a copy, either from Nightboat Books, the publisher, or from amazon.com. Either way, you’re bound to be rewarded.

There’s Something Happening Here

I’m working with artist David D. Kalal on a conversation in animated gifs. These two are the latest.

My second animated gif for Inbetweentheories.com, a non-theoretical critical response to contemporary culture

 

animated gif in support of whistle-blowers Chelsea Manning and Edward Snowden
My third gif for Inbetweentheories.com. I am enjoying data bending & glitching images, but the next one will be DIFFERENT!

Our website is Inbewteentheories.com. Visit us!

 

 

Parijat Desai Dance Company at Harlem Stage

I went to Harlem Stage last night to see Parijat Desai’s performance of her piece JustLikeThat. It was intelligent, fantastic, and the dancers are amazing. Thank you, Parijat! 

The choreography presented a riff on the news – the who, what, when, where, why and how – journalism with Indian and American influences, ultimately about the collusion of mass media and corrupt politicians to more or less not inform the public of what’s really going on with the people who pull the strings.

Well, I’m not describing it very well! Go see it for yourself!

Here’s a clip from a previous iteration – this piece keeps evolving:

and here’s an interview with Parijat Desai

Get tickets for tonight’s show at 7:30 here  >> http://harlemstage.org/331-48-730pme-moves-18/

Other choreographers presenting works include Leyland Simmons (Dance Theater of Harlem), Francesca Harper, and Kyle Marshall

 


Cecilia Dougherty at the Wexner Center for the Arts

This Woman’s Work: Ericka Beckman, Cecilia Dougherty, and Jennifer Reeder

In celebration of the Film/Video Studio Program

Sat, Apr 8, 2017 12:30 PM
 
video still from Gone, 2-channel installation by Cecilia Dougherty
Video still from my 2-channel installation GONE (2001, 37 mins), starring the inimitable Laurie Weeks.

Join the Wexner to celebrate the accomplished work of female filmmakers supported by the studio throughout its 27-year history. Exploring both traditional and experimental approaches to narrative, this program includes Hiatus, Ericka Beckman’s phantasmagoric, analogue exploration of virtual reality (1999, 30 mins., 16mm transferred to video); Gone, Cecilia Dougherty’s split-screen recreation of the PBS docudrama An American Family, here starring artists Laurie Weeks and Amy Sillman and featuring music by Le Tigre and Mike Iveson (2001, 36 mins., video); and the Ohio premiere of Artist Residency Award recipient Jennifer Reeder’s 2016 film Crystal Lake (19 mins., HD video). (program approx. 85 mins.)

Curated by the excellent Jennifer Lange

Fishing for Some Friends in Melbourne

video screening of works by Cecilia Dougherty and others, Feb 16, 2017, Melbourne Australia

Upcoming video screening by Cecilia Dougherty and others.

Fishing for Some Friends is a moving image exhibition in response to the misplacement of images both historic and contemporary. Contained within are images which due to aesthetic and political subversiveness have no collective home within Melbourne’s current cinematic landscape. These homeless images skirt the peripheries on the internet; skimming intermittently into conversations before being lost in the feed of information.

Fishing for Some Friends has caught some people and works that are excited about exploring new modes of representation, reimagining aesthetic expectations and citing alternative perspectives and conversations.

Fishing for Some Friends creates temporary space for moving image works from Cecilia Dougherty (New York), Charlie Freedman (Melbourne), Larisa Kosloff (Melbourne), Lucie McMahan (Melbourne), Meg & Jackson (Melbourne), Phoebe Mackenzie (Sydney), Siegfried A. Fruhauf (Vienna) and Steven Rhall (Melbourne)

6:00 – 11:00pm
16th February
115 Little Smith St. Fitzroy
Melbourne
Australia

Works of mine that are screening in this exhibition:
In A Station, Petals (2011, silent, 14:25) with a piece called Swell by Melbourne artist Laresa Kosloff, with a score by Melbourne musician Gregor

Also screening my first ever video, Gay Tape: Butch and Femme (1985, 26:50)

Shout out and thanks to Lucie McMahon, Melbourne!

 

 

Screening & Panel Discussion at MIX29 Queer Experimental Film Fest

Mix Queer Experimental Film Festival screening and panel discussion
Mix Queer Experimental Film Festival screening and panel discussion Feb 5, 2017

Artist and co-curator extraordinaire David Kalal and I have been working on a screening program and panel, called In-Between Theories, for the 29th MIX Queer Experimental Film Festival based on ideas we’ve been tossing around for at least a year. Or possibly longer!

The program is an exploration of queer ideas and expressions that are not quite the media for academic or even queer-political categorization, and which fall into – or more precisely, create – their own time/spaces.

When: Sunday, Feb 5, 6PM

Where: MIX29, The Dreamhouse, 1022 Wyckoff Ave., Bklyn/Flushing
(L train to Halsey)

What: Film, video and interactive work with a discussion with the artists to follow — things are going to get real — or maybe unreal — promises to be a great evening either way.

Click on the invite picture to go to our website http://www.inbetweentheories.com
with more information about the work and artists

… or go straight to the Festival website: https://mixnyc29.org/

Hope you can come out for In-Between Theories at MIX 29 on Sunday February 5th!

Leaders lead, twits tweet

Even though I use Twitter the most of any social media, the sign below was my favorite yesterday as me and 400,000 other people walked up New York’s Fifth Ave for the Women’s March.

But I’m getting ahead of myself. First off, the ride on the Staten Island Ferry over to Manhattan had a number of small groups of people going to the Women’s March, which for Staten Island, New York’s only Republican borough, is very fine.  Right off the ferry and onto the No. 6 train, which was crowded with marchers. Festive atmosphere all around. The scene getting off the train and emerging into Grand Central was even better,  like this:

with wall to wall marchers. I don’t often congratulate Men As A Group, but you guys did well, showing up in large numbers. Could say “thanks!” but honestly if you’re doing it for one so-called-group (‘women’ btw are NOT a ‘group’, we are what you’d call HUMANS), you’re doing it for everyone, including yourselves.

Once on the street just outside GCT, it looked like this:

and then as we marched, people were really determined to keep this momentum going, some were in a party mood, and some like me still fearful because our president doesn’t know how to be a public servant and may completely tank not only the economy, the environment, women’s rights, voter’s rights, immigrant rights, freedoms of religion and belief, and our healthcare access,  but the democracy itself. 

STAY INVOLVED.